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VIDEO: Misogyny in Horror: I Spit on Your Grave (1978), Part 2

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Is I Spit on Your Grave a modern retelling of ancient goddess myths? Join Count Jackula as he finishes up his analysis, which includes this film’s infamous rape scenes. Watch Part One of the I Spit on Your Grave review here!

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  • Yurifan

    Thank you for such an indepth and thought provoking review.

    • Jack Shen

      Thank you for watching and commenting! It feels good finding out that there are women who appreciate this series.

  • MichaelANovelli

    Well done, sir! Truly, you have topped yourself!

    • Jack Shen

      Word up my man.

  • Shark Wayne

    Damn man… first half… very well detailed analysis man. After that I needed a beer. lol
    and the other half was a satisfying way to end it.
    You beat DVD Shelf: Who Framed Roger Rabbit Review as
    The best review I’ve ever seen. Well… I would say evenly matched but you
    win by a nose. lol
    Now if you excuse me… I’m going to watch MLP as a palad cleanser

    • Jack Shen

      After what those four men did to Twilight Sparkle? How could you? 🙂

  • Richard Eriksson Hjelm

    So what part of a man does the male god you disscused earlier in the video represent? If he gives her his silent consent then it cannot be the male nature on display in the men in the movie.

    • Jack Shen

      The male god in ISOYG represents the part of male nature that says “An eye for an eye.”

  • The Horror Guru

    Fan-fucking-tastic as per usual, my friend. =)

  • TheRedWorm

    This is probably the best recap on this site. Not the funniest, mind, that goes to PGSM summarizes, but the best. Excellent work.

    • Jack Shen

      A comparison between The Count Jackula Show and PGSM? That is some esteemed company! Thanks man 🙂

  • Lord Throbula

    I’m a devoted viewer of this sight and have never commented before, but this review……incredible! Well done!

    • Jack Shen

      Word up! Glad you commented, hope you continue this commenting trend 🙂

  • The_Stig

    Yanno, I think Freud can be best summed up in three words: Everything is dicks. 🙂 Actually, I think you hit the nail on the head with the “spider in her web” analogy, because a spider’s web is exactly what the hammock she was laying in reminds me of.

    Fun Fact: During a flashback on the Supernatural episode “After School Special” a teenage Dean Winchester is macking on one of the cheerleaders when he offers to take her on a date that involves a midnight screening of I Spit on Your Grave….which is probably the last movie you want to take a date to (unless of course your name is Johnny 23).

    Also: Points for using Inkubus/Sukkubus.

    • Jack Shen

      I’m glad you noticed Inkubus/Sukkubus. And yeah, I noticed the ISOYG reference in Supernatural. I also like the fact that they continued Dean’s love of horror and anime. IT’S AN ARTFORM!

      • The_Stig

        And westerns. Don’t forget westerns.

  • $36060516

    Thoughtful review. Here I come again with a contrarian thought (which I intend as a compliment to your work, given if I didn’t respect it I wouldn’t post). You showed a picture of Yoko Ono and The Beatles to illustrate the concept of men hating women because of jealousy over their favor disrupting the established order. I don’t think Yoko’s an accurate example of what you’re talking about, though, as the other Beatles did not desire attention from Ono, they were upset that Lennon insisted on bringing her into the Beatles recording sessions. True, that did disrupt the existing order, but in a way that wasn’t necessarily gender-related. If Paul McCartney suddenly made a really close male friend outside of the band and insisted on bringing him into all the Beatles recording sessions and inviting his creative input they would gotten upset at that person just as much, it seems to me. I do agree that a lot of the Beatle fan backlash against her was misogynistic, though.

    • Jack Shen

      You have a point about Yoko, and I did consider using a different series of pictures that might illustrate it better, since The Beatles reaction could easily be applied to a man coming in, but I still think the fact that Yoko was a women, is what made it more polarizing. But I couldn’t think of a more well known example.

      • Jack Shen

        Crap! We just realized a better clip we could have used there….ANCHORMAN. Well, next time.

        • $36060516

          An artist’s work is never done! Heard stories about a famous painter who would go into the homes of people he had sold paintings to and start retouching them.

      • The_Stig

        Yoko gets a lot of unfair treatment from Beatles fans. I believe that she wasn’t what broke up the Beatles, but she was only one of many contributing factors….but that doesn’t mean she wasn’t fucking insufferable.

  • Moppet

    Thank you Count, so very much.

    • Jack Shen

      Anytime 🙂

  • Creature SH

    This was a rather impressive and uncomfortable analysis. And in this case, “uncomfortable” is the right thing.

    • Jack Shen

      It’s why I love horror movies. Not all forms of art are meant to be comfortable. As Rob Zombie said to Bill Mosely “Art’s not safe.” Thanks for your kind words.

  • jjramsey

    This analysis was fascinating. There are a couple things that bug me, though.

    1) Connecting aspects of the movie to various ancient myths seems like a stretch.

    2) Judging from your commentary, it looks like the violence in the scenes where Jennifer takes her revenge were sexualized, and for a lot of people, that comes across as exploitative. I wish you had touched on that a bit more, since that probably has colored a lot of people’s reactions to the movie at least as much as the rape scenes themselves.

    • $36060516

      I was thinking the same thing about point #2, jjramsey — it didn’t seem very plausible that she would willingly put herself in the position of having intercourse with the first guy she took revenge on before hanging him. Didn’t seem much point to that other than titillation of the audience. I also kind of disagreed that showing her frightened and angry face while she was being raped was an effective counterbalance to the lingering shots of her naked body while it was happening, as given that rape is an act of violence and control the kinds of guys who are most likely to do something like that would probably enjoy seeing her suffering face as much as the nudity. It is not something that would kill the thrill for those people.

      • Jack Shen

        Having a rape victim take revenge on her attackers using her sexuality (which is what they took from her) probably isn’t very realistic, BUT neither is the idea of a guy murdering an entire group of criminals for murdering his family (Death Wish, The Crow, The Punisher, etc).

        Some stories are intended to express anger and allow people to vicariously engage in the dark impulse one feels when you are wronged. Women deserve to engage in that too.

        The way the rape scenes are shot is as much about Jennifer’s objectification by the rapists and audience alike. Yes, the rapists probably DO enjoy seeing her suffer. But we the audience are not brought in on that enjoyment. We are intentionally excluded from it. We are supposed to see it as terrible.

        And I, for one, did.

        • $36060516

          Yeah, you got a point. Realism isn’t the goal of all art, nor should it be.

          • FilmKnight

            Just to carry on from that. I wasn’t faulting this movie above for being unrealistic. I get it’s wish fulfillment, I just wish it didn’t have to good SOOOO out of the way to make the villains as hateful as possible. It’s not a particularly difficult thing to make audience sympathize with or despise a character. It’s basic requirement of fiction. Which as why one of the reasons I so admire Hard Candy (which deals with many of these same theme better in my mind), is that it completely turns the tables about how we’re supposed to side with and manages to find the pity and the despicable in both the predator and the prey.

            Also I agree that the rape scenes were shot here in way the makes us see things from the victim side, but there’s no telling how some audience might response. Regarding your comparison to The Accused, I think Jodie Foster said she walked out of some theater showing the movie because people where cheering on characters rape.

            BTW it’s kind of strange that you can’t show the nudity in these scene, but you can show all the gruesome violence. Nudity is probably one of the lest disturbing parts and (well maybe this was your intention) but does imposing the MLPFM shot actually makes this even MORE disturbing in context?

          • Jack Shen

            So wait…you’d like I Spit On Your Grave better…if the RAPISTS were more likable?

          • Filmknight

            No that would have been worse! I just think they don’t have to make the violence go so long just to make it clear these are terrible people.

          • FullofQuestions1

            I think he does have a point actually- writers and filmmakers often feel that they have to make a sexual assault as violent as possible or the audience won’t realize that it’s bad. I can only think of a few books and movies where a victim did not put up some sort of fight when being sexually assaulted, and that is a damaging mindset in other ways. There are way too many people who think that it’s not rape if the victim didn’t fight back or say no. And there are also way too many people who think that if a rapist isn’t violent in some other way, then it’s not rape.

          • Jack Shen

            I don’t think making rapists unsympathetic is a bad thing.

    • Jack Shen

      NO, connecting aspects of the movie to mythology is not a stretch. That director’s commentary makes it clear that’s what he had in mind. Hang on I see that a reply to your comment ALSO discusses the sexualization in the later half so I’ll respond to that there.

  • FullofQuestions1

    I had a hard time watching all the clips, but this was seriously well done. It was maturely and intelligently handled, with a ton of background knowledge, as well as some appropriately placed humor.

    I wonder, what do you think of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo series as a rape revenge story? Without spoiling too much, I thought that one was difficult to watch but extremely well handled. The brutality of the assaults was very well portrayed in the movies, making the revenge that much more meaningful. Interestingly enough, that series was also semi-autobiographical- when Stieg Larsson was fifteen, he witnessed three of his friends gang-raping a girl named Lisbeth. He never got over the guilt of not intervening.

    • Jack Shen

      I consider the American re-make of “Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” to be “David Fincher’s I Spit On Your Grave.” It does much the same story in a completely different setting and context. And like “I Spit On Your Grave” it keeps the wronged woman in focus as a sympathetic character. Unlike the 2010 remake of “ISOYG.”

      With that said, “Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” owes much to “I Spit On Your Grave.” I almost used it as the example of how the rape scene influenced ones that came later, but in the end, The Crow was a better fit for that analysis.

      • $36060516

        Something I liked about that one that this didn’t have was that she went on from getting revenge on her rapist to being a hero using mental and physical skills in another unrelated situation, saving a dudesel in distress in the process. Her story wasn’t defined solely by the rape.

        • John Wilson

          I didn’t like the Millennium series. The books or movies. They were kind of uninteresting. Though I did type a little bit of a lighter and softer fan fic of the girl that goes into the Sci fi world so:).

          • chromesthesia

            The first book had too many descriptions of sandwiches and apple products. Then when I thought it was going to end it went on and was uninteresting. I did like Lizbeth though.

        • Jack Shen

          Well, not to start an argument here, but Lisbeth has dedicated her life to catching and brutalizing rapists because she herself was raped. She is TOTALLY defined by her rape. Almost entirely so.

          • $36060516

            I’ve only seen the Swedish TV version of the first book, have not read the books or seen the adaptations of the other two books. But in the adaptation I saw, she is raped, and then in a separate storyline as part of her day job she hacks a journalist’s computer and the journalist confronts her about that and she agrees to help him investigate a serial killer who they later discover rapes women before he kills them (at least I don’t remember them discovering that until after she already had started investigating the case). She did not seem to make a choice to go after that serial killer based on being raped. Again, I can only go on the adaptation I saw. She also didn’t set out to brutalize the serial killer/rapist, as you seem to be suggesting. She was attempting to help the journalist investigating the case and then when given the choice about whether or not to help the killer out of a burning car that he ended up in while fleeing made the choice to let him burn, which is a lot different than premeditating a brutal revenge on him.

          • FullofQuestions1

            She was dedicated to it before, because of what Zalachenko did to her mother (granted, one of the things he did was sexually assault her mother). What you could argue, actually, was that she dedicated her life to bringing men who hate women (see what I did there) to some sort of justice.

  • FilmKnight

    I’ve already given most of my thoughts on this kind of movie on The Cinema Snob forum on TGWTG so I won’t repeat most of it here. My real problem with these so-called “rape and revenge” films isn’t necessarily the violence because as you said this scenario appears on Lifetime constantly (though I’m not sure about your claim no one complains about those). What I find insulting about most of them is there ALL about the rape and revenge. They treat violence as I mean to an end, but than try to cover it with a theme of FEMALE EMPOWERMENT than would have been impossible if the gender roles were reversed. All that stuff you talked about mythology, courtroom bias, even the true story of the direction would all make much more interesting stories than the bland formula that particular movie boils down to.

    1) Innocent woman is brutalized by savage men

    2) Woman brutalize the same men and get away without and that somehow balances out the universe

    To me the idea that a woman can’t survive becoming the victim of brutality without becoming brutal herself isn’t feminist it’s nihilist. It’s seeing a movie filled with 20 plus minutes of dog fights is somehow pro-animal rights because one of the dogs kills the master and gets away. Of course you could argue that all lot of those male oriented revenage movies you mention below are just as absurd, but this movie seems to try to be something more profound than it really is. Your analyzes was profound, but I don’t think most people would get that from the movie.

    I guess what I’m trying to say is a prefer more range in stories about such brutal subject. Less sensationalism and reliance on easy answer wish fulfillment fantasy where the character doesn’t just damn herself by sinking to her attackers level with the same power of four men and just feeling in about like that’s all you need to recover. In my mind that makes her little better than they are. As someone wrote below the heroine in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo work to something good with her experiences rather than just, as the Bard wrote “Better the Instruction.” Because you know how well that worked out for Shylock!

    • Jack Shen

      I would say that a movie about dog fighting that ends with one
      of the dogs killing it’s master and getting away WOULD be a pro-animal right’s
      movie. I’m surprised you wouldn’t see it that way too.

      • Filmknight

        Well first of all another critic (I forget his name) used pretty much the same metaphor I used for this movie only it involved cock fighting where the cock survives. I wasn’t making a comparison to the lead characters role, only the basic two-part plot outline I described above. Plus, you’d be surprised how many people are more upset seeing just one dog dying in the movie over several people! I remember John Turturro saying that in one movie he did people where angrier at him for killing a penguin than throwing his own mother out a window. I’m not comparing animal deaths to gang rapes, only saying that it’s easy to stir up the audience blood lust towards the villains when they are one-dimensional brutes who savage someone defenseless for the bulk of the movie. (Though in fairness, you managed to make the pretty persuasive argument that the villains in this movie where more two-dimensional).

        As for whether this is Pro-Woman picture, I guess you could see it is and I did find your analysis fascinating. As I said about, the problem for me this kind of plot line is that try to make seeing a woman savaged lurid detail is simple balance out by having savage the attackers in equally lurid detail. To me it’s just tit for tat, mayhem meets mayhem, hate meets hate. One doesn’t really balance out the other for me.

        A Clockwork Orange, Dirty Harry, Straw Dogs, even The Last House on the Left which this movie is so often compared to featured rape and revenge as plot point, but they presented something tragic about the way the heroes got there revenge. Like it didn’t really make everything better and they were never going to live this down. Of course for someone outside the realm of respectability as an outspoken feminist would be as this environment (which you clearly illustrate) the odds of her even getting away with it are far worse. That’s why I don’t buy this movie tagline, “There isn’t a jury in the world that would convict her,” since no one on the jury would have witness the rape and someone could still find evidence linking her to the murders.

        There’s a lot more I could say on this subject and frankly it seems futile to spend it all on one movie especially when you have two more videos to go through. These are important issue to consider in one of the most debated and less understood of genre so I thank you taking the time to make these videos and bringing this sort of healthy
        and enlightening debate to a wider audience. Look forward to what seeing what you’ve get next.

        • Filmknight

          And to make it extra clear even so many other have said it, though we may seriously disagree about the merits of this particular movie you did a brilliant jobs of interpret ion and evaluation and now I look forward to sampling so of your earlier work.

    • Jack Shen

      Also, I find it interesting that we’re talking about a movie where a woman gets raped and you compared her role to theoretical movie about a DOG. Shall I assume that was unintentional?

  • John Wilson

    I think the review in dept. Its just that I don’t like the movie.Sure some parts I see in the review I don’t like are too femist for my taste(i’m not going to get into that because this would be too hard to explain online like this). But that may be I don’t like the movie. I feel a lot like ebert on the movie.

    http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/i-spit-on-your-grave-1980#disqus_thread

    http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/i-spit-on-your-grave-2010

    • Jack Shen

      …cocaine is a hell of a drug. Is English your second language? NO seriously, I don’t wanna pick on someone for poor grammar if there is ACTUALLY a language barrier here.

      • John Wilson

        No, its just the coke:)J.K.

        • John Wilson

          Sorry about that. It was kind of late night after a long day. What I meant to say is I don’t like the movie for the same reasons Ebert didn’t like the movie. I also disagree with some of the points made in the video. Though that may have to do with you being very Liberal(possible,I don’t actually know you to say for sure). And me being an in-between Liberal and Conservative.Hope that clear things up for you:).

          • John Wilson

            Also are you guys doing V/H/S 2. That review going to be a lot of fun:).

          • The Horror Guru

            Hell yeah we will be. We watched it last night and will be writing our reviews very soon. =)

  • PopcornJockey

    great episode. i really found the connections to mythology/religion to be especially fascinating, as i’m a religious studies major and found myself making connections with spirituality and other forms of media.

    really intrigued on what you’ll tackle in the next video. keep it up!

  • Ashantai

    This was an exceptionally well done review. No offence, but I didn’t expect such an articulate and thoughtful treatment of a rather disturbing subject. Great work. 🙂

  • MephLord

    I had to think long about both this movie, the horror genre, and overall media in general. While this movie clearly illustrates misogyny and the social consequences, there must be a bigger play at work here. Not everything is a conspiracy mind you, but social media does quite affect public morality and what is acceptable.

    I don’t know that much about the issue but working with mostly men, authority does give a level of being able to dictate what other men do, even if the consequences are not that great (nothing of personal injury, just costing the company on bad decisions). Overall if misogyny is about the hatred of women in particular, it implies to a feeling of overall control and women represent a threat to that power structure.

    There are so many other possible examples to work from, I’m sure Vandal Savage in JLU is a misogyny archetype because he doesn’t respect any woman even thought they primarily defeat him, as do what he calls “children.” I like that you are doing this series and feel it’s important to look at the perspective of a male, because a woman recapping this movie might be labeled a feminist or lesbian, whereas a man doesn’t suffer the stigma of those labels.

    Final note, this recap was something I was looking forward to and it does not disappoint. I would hold up your recaps next to Sofies, Film Brains, Blockbuster Busters and MikeJ’s (Love the Shameful Sequels series too). The production value is incredible it must take a lot of time to do something with so much production put into it.

    • John Wilson

      Well a man can be called a feminist

  • MichaelANovelli

    You bring up The Accused; I’ve never actually seen it and only know it by it’s reputation, but isn’t that the movie where Jodie Foster’s character was so unlikable that audiences were actually cheering when she got raped? I vaguely remember her bringing that up in an interview, once.

    • Cheshire Cat

      A bit of trivia about The Accused: she wasn’t able to sue the actual rapists, so the lawyer went after the men who stood back and cheered them on.

      • Carlos Rivas

        You mean in real life, because while cheering on rape is bad, if the courts can arrest for that then, holy crap the system is broken. Micheal is right, jodie’s Foster’s charactor is absolutely annoying, she is whiny bitch with no sense of herself and has a deep personal hatred of herself. i watched it last night, her charactor did everything short of a BJ to entice the men, in real life i bet the real person didnt.

        • Mike

          There were conflicting accounts of the real case in question, partially do to the fast and heavy amount of media coverage. I found pretty good summery report in the aftermath of the trial and it’s impact. http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=5XobAAAAIBAJ&sjid=6k4EAAAAIBAJ&pg=6760,4684003&dq=big+dan+case+cheering&hl=en
          Are we supposed to believe that because the character in the movie came off as a weak person in behavior and outlook that her case for rape wasn’t strong? Or than encouragement can’t count as being an accessory to a violent crime?

          • Carlos Rivas

            you mean kenny, yeah he is weak and we didnt see his trial yet, he has his day, he also turned on his childhood friend, weak all over. he would have been best to keep his mouth shut. Sadie in the movie is not weak, she is questionable as a witness because of her prior conviction and thier is doubt on wether it is sexual assualt or rape since she did entice them to do it, as on e the defense lawyers said, “she did everything but yank thier dicks.” it doesnt justify assault but it makes it easy to understand why it happened. rape is about power, their a bunch of drunken idiots who just wanted to get laid.

  • Christopher Roach

    Great episode, but one minor nitpick that has nothing to do with the overall theme of the episode. In The Crow clip T-Bird is reading from Milton’s Paradise Lost, not Shelly’s poetry.

  • Carlos Rivas

    It s reviews like this that prove Aogny booth is getting better than most of That guywith the glasses, with exception of doug Walker, chez apocalypse albiet their almost seperate at this point.

  • The Horror Guru

    My favorite was when you talked about I Spit on your Grave.

    • Jack Shen

      …in order to save Carrie, from the Ghoulies, while she’s at Sleepaway Camp!

      • MephLord

        Meanwhile, the Poltergeist and the Gremlin had to survive the Amityville Horror, while Jason and Freddie, on Halloween were fighting a Hellraiser. What an easy to interact genre it is!

        • MichaelANovelli

          And to think they were brought together by some kind of Paranormal Entity!

          • The Horror Guru

            This movie is the shiz.

          • MephLord

            Only if some White Noise, a fucking Ring, a random Eye, and Captivity is somehow involved. Oh and some Texas Chainsaw’s since we need product placement.

  • Barbara

    I tend to agree with Nicholas Grey’s comment about Johnny’s death: he was the main instigator, and it somehow seems more fitting to have him die last, rather than Andy and Stanley. And at first, I didn’t understand why Jennifer didn’t simply shoot Johnny when she had the chance; however, death by castration and/or emasculation is arguably worse than simply being shot.

    I enjoyed both parts of this analysis. Misogyny and horror films have always been linked in some way (to me, anyway). This is not because women die (in horror fims, nearly everyone dies) but rather because of the context in which women die. They’re usually partially or fully nude and getting a machete/hatchet/chainsaw/whatever through their skulls. The linking of sex and violence in horror films really creeps me out.

    • Jack Shen

      I think the order of the rapist’s death is fine. It is the exact reverse order she encounters them in the rape scenes and mirrors the order that things were taken from her.

      The linking of of sex and violence in film can be bothersome. But if you look at their relationship to each other, you find, not a connection so much as a fulcrum. On one end, is Sex on the other Violence. As films are less able to explore sex, they need something to bring more people in, so they get more violent. Sexual repression is what connects them. Because as any pornographer can tell you, people hate to lose depictions of violence, but they WILL NOT DO WITHOUT depictions of sex.

      The movie American Grindhouse goes into this, and it’s a fun and fascinating documentary. It’s on Netflix right now, you should check it out.

      • Barbara

        I may see that; thanks for the recommendation.

  • MephLord

    Count Jackula I have to admit, did you ever expect to get so many comments from such a topic? Breaking 100 comments on a single video is something that rarely ever happens, maybe because the movie is so poignant and personal, but also because it’s so well done. And the Kali reference, I almost think that the movie was using the Sarasvati reference while around the water; beautiful, serene, and creative (let’s not forget she was writing a story), before the Kali demon took over and only got peace of her Sarasvati portion when the male demons were disposed of. The Indian mythos was definitely prevalent in the telling of the story, and despite all of the haters of the movie, remains an important film to have social bearing.

  • Zee Panda

    Thanks for this – an intriguing concept, very well expressed. I’m sure still that I don’t want to see this movie, but I’ll no longer dismiss it as pure exploitation crap. I was fascinated by the title change and wonder now how much difference the title makes in the way that people think about the movie.

    • Jack Shen

      Absolutely, I wish it could have gotten the notoriety it has now under the title “Day of The Woman.” And it really is the only rape revenge film I’ve seen where the revenge is totally unambiguous.

  • James Elfers

    Like many fans of horror i feel that you read far too much into this film. Horror is not just about societal unease. Often it is about the mundane becoming horrific. Sometimes those two things are combined into one. Such a film would be “Deliverance” Another failing of horror is that it far too often has otherwise intelligent people behaving like idiots or becoming clichés. “I spit on your grave” is no different. It is a simple revenge scenario with a woman protagonist. In “Dirty Harry” Clint Eastwood guns down the paedophile in the end. That character is as creepy and scary as anything in a horror movie except that he is the real deal. Awful people really do exist and they can strike at any time. Is “Dirty Harry” about the “empowerment” of cops? NO! and neither is this movie a feminist manifesto.

    Unlike Dirty harry who kills the horror so that it can not kill again. The “hero” of “I Spit On Your Grave” becomes WORSE than her tormentors. Yes the men are vile, scum rapists but they are NOT killers. Unlike Dirty harry she is not a law man at the end of his Constitutional rope. She is Jane Q. Citizen and therefore just as subject to the law as anyone else. Harry Callahan lashes out and takes the law into his own hands because the corrupt system has let him down and he has no choice. Hills NEVER tries to work within the legal system As cathartic revenge film it is fine but it has NO GREATER MEANING! She Not only becomes a monster to hunt monsters she turns into a serial killer, the very worst of human monsters! Far from being redeemed by her bloodsport she becomes even more tarnished than her tormentors originally made her!

    If it were truly a feminist film she would have behaved in a more humane and sensitive manner than her tormentors. Perhaps not to the extent of turning the other cheek but certainly through using her considerable smarts and superior moral and legal position to put them in their place. it is puzzling that a journalist never tries the expedient of publicly shaming her oppressors or forcing the law to get involved through USE OF THE MEDIA! No its just they did me wrong and they MUST pay!.

    As much as you protest this movie is ALL about the male gaze. We are supposed to feel greater sympathy for the victim because she is white, employed, intelligent, and above all ATTRACTIVE! Imagine this movie if the protagonist was a rotund fat woman. The sympathy we have for her is tied up directly with her desirability. This movie would not have been made if the victim were unattractive or elderly, but elderly and the unattractive women get raped just as often as attractive ones do,

    Like so many fans of horror you look for subtexts that simply are NOT there.

    • Michelle Kirkwood

      Yep,it’s exactly that!

  • chromesthesia

    4 parts? Are you going to do more of these? Because these videos were extremely interesting.