Let Happy Help You Feel Better With Hot Beverages

Let Happy Help You Feel Better With Hot Beverages

As the person here who cooks, people look to me for a good chicken soup recipe during cold and flu season. I hope you find it with my cookbooks, because I’m not getting off the couch. I am fixing to die from a 24-hour Ebola, but I have some ideas about what you can eat or drink when you finally get what is going around.

WARM BEVERAGES

Red Zinger and chamomile tea are fine, until I wanted to throw it at the wall. They got old fast. I made tea out of fresh ginger, because ginger is good for stomachs and noses. You know what else it does? It enhances your body temperature. I wanted a fever to burn my cold to the ground. If you like playing with fire, throw this Molotov cocktail right in the face of your virus:

1 2-inch ginger root, peeled and sliced thin (or grated)
2 c. water
Fresh lemon juice
Honey to taste

Boil the water and add ginger. Cover and simmer for 20-30 minutes. Strain this into a cup, and then add lemon. The yellow tea will turn pinkish with the introduction of lemon juice, and that’s OK. Add honey to taste.

I enjoyed two cups of ginger tea before bedtime. It was a fitful night for me, right out a Pink Floyd song, but I woke up feeling better than the day before. Not cured, but better.

An old wives tale lists warm water, honey, lemon and whiskey as helpful for a head cold. This remedy is a cup full of conflicting messages. Honey and lemon, sure, but whiskey will dry you out and you need hydrating! Exceptions can be made for alcoholics. I absolutely agree than no one should have flu symptoms and delirium tremens at the same time.

ZINC AND VITAMIN C

Experimenting with zinc and Vitamin C made me feel hopeful, and I have heard that hope is a very important thing to maintain when dealing with incurable diseases. Still, a punch in the face would have been more consequential than taking zinc or Vitamin C. Vitamins and minerals, you are useless liars.

CHICKEN SOUP

Only mention chicken soup if you are going to make some, because sick people cannot drive to the store or cook for three hours. If you cannot find a volunteer to make chicken soup, unpack your pile of take-out menus. Order enough soup to make it worth the delivery person’s time. Those of you who have no delivery options should ask a friend or relative to drop off a few cans. If you have no one to call, there are no recipes to reverse misanthropy. Sociopaths often find a soft touch to manipulate, and you would do well to consult them for recommendations.

With regards to curative properties, chicken soup gets an F. Yes, it has some ingredients that help your immune system. Warm soup soothes a sore throat and sinus pain, and it will fill your stomach, but these small reprieves are temporary and miniscule in scale. Be willing to accept some help, over no help at all.

Get some rest, wipe your sloppy face and feel better soon. I will too.

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  • SullivanSt

    “Right out a Pink Floyd song”So this happened when you were a child.

    • Mojopo

      Two balloons. And I hate Pink Floyd.

  • dorquemada

    Tomato Soup. We keep a few cans in the pantry for colds, flu, and the inevitable apocalypse.

  • Annie Towne

    I recommend you add garlic to your ginger tea. What I do is crush garlic and add some ginger to it, pureed, or whatever you have to do to get it good and mixed up, then keep it sealed tightly in the fridge so that you have it when you get even a hint of sickness. I make enough to get through the winter (a little project for you when you get well again). What makes chicken soup so curative and soothing is the garlic and onions, both of which have been used for centuries. But you can’t cook it when you’re sick, so again, make a good, rich stock from the gelatin left from a roast chicken (plus the usual stock ingredients) and keep it in the freezer. When you’re sick, just thaw it and add leftovers, ramen noodles, whatever, and you’ve got a good meal that’s easy to keep down and will make you feel much better.

    • Mojopo

      Annie, you are an angel from Heaven and that is wonderful advice. I love you.

      • Annie Towne

        Gosh! I’m all a-blush. I hope you feel better soon. Oh, and don’t forget to keep some of the broth each time you make soup to stick back in the freezer for next time, and so on, and so on…

  • Karen McCrocklin

    My old wife loves whiskey.