Elektra (2005) (part 4 of 10)

Back inside her house, a shadow on the wall lets us know that an intruder is upstairs. Our highly trained assassin grabs a nearby box cutter and slowly advances. She heads upstairs and sees a running figure, and throws the box cutter, which nails the person’s sleeve to the wall. But of course, this maneuver only works because the runner just happens to raise an arm at exactly the right moment.

And then we find out the intruder is a teenage girl, which sharp-eyed Elektra must have seen right away. I also think the perfectly visible blonde ponytail might have been a bit of a giveaway.

The girl is shocked, and shouts that Elektra could have killed her. Elektra demands to know what the mysterious teenager is doing in her house, and it turns out the almost-victim is friends with the family that usually rents the place. While she complains about her ruined jacket, Elektra shows all the affability and politeness of an interrogator.

Elektra: How did you get in?
Girl: The door was unlocked.
Elektra: No, it wasn’t.
Girl: Yeah, it was.

As it so happens, the lock is broken. And Elektra didn’t notice. Nailing harmless people to walls, overlooking security holes, arranging toothbrushes and bananas with painstaking care… She’s not the most credible movie assassin, is she?

To read the rest of this article, support the Agony Booth on Patreon.
This post is available to our patrons who pledge $5 or more per month on Patreon. Click the “Unlock with Patreon” button below to sign up with Patreon or to log in with your existing Patreon account.
Already a Patreon member? Refresh to access this post.

The Fili

Hi, my name is Matthias, I am a student of English and German, and may one day even get to teach these (if my university ever works out how to run a B.A. system). I live in a medium-sized German town few have ever heard of, and have only recently discovered the joys of suffering through horrible movies, describing them in every little... okay, let's forget about the joy and make that therapeutic effect.

Multi-Part Article: Elektra (2005)

You may also like...