Author: Dr. Winston O'Boogie

(500) Days of Summer (2009) (part 10 of 10)

“Not so long ago, it seemed that to make a well-regarded, critically acclaimed movie, you needed to have something remarkable to say, or at least a unique perspective on life. But as the makers of last year’s indie sensation (500) Days of Summer have shown, all you really need to do is watch a lot of movies, and have one mildly crappy relationship, and you’ve earned the right to make your mundane life experiences into a film, and subsequently be hailed as a genius for it.”

(500) Days of Summer (2009) (part 9 of 10)

“Not so long ago, it seemed that to make a well-regarded, critically acclaimed movie, you needed to have something remarkable to say, or at least a unique perspective on life. But as the makers of last year’s indie sensation (500) Days of Summer have shown, all you really need to do is watch a lot of movies, and have one mildly crappy relationship, and you’ve earned the right to make your mundane life experiences into a film, and subsequently be hailed as a genius for it.”

(500) Days of Summer (2009) (part 8 of 10)

“Not so long ago, it seemed that to make a well-regarded, critically acclaimed movie, you needed to have something remarkable to say, or at least a unique perspective on life. But as the makers of last year’s indie sensation (500) Days of Summer have shown, all you really need to do is watch a lot of movies, and have one mildly crappy relationship, and you’ve earned the right to make your mundane life experiences into a film, and subsequently be hailed as a genius for it.”

(500) Days of Summer (2009) (part 7 of 10)

“Not so long ago, it seemed that to make a well-regarded, critically acclaimed movie, you needed to have something remarkable to say, or at least a unique perspective on life. But as the makers of last year’s indie sensation (500) Days of Summer have shown, all you really need to do is watch a lot of movies, and have one mildly crappy relationship, and you’ve earned the right to make your mundane life experiences into a film, and subsequently be hailed as a genius for it.”

(500) Days of Summer (2009) (part 6 of 10)

“Not so long ago, it seemed that to make a well-regarded, critically acclaimed movie, you needed to have something remarkable to say, or at least a unique perspective on life. But as the makers of last year’s indie sensation (500) Days of Summer have shown, all you really need to do is watch a lot of movies, and have one mildly crappy relationship, and you’ve earned the right to make your mundane life experiences into a film, and subsequently be hailed as a genius for it.”

(500) Days of Summer (2009) (part 5 of 10)

“Not so long ago, it seemed that to make a well-regarded, critically acclaimed movie, you needed to have something remarkable to say, or at least a unique perspective on life. But as the makers of last year’s indie sensation (500) Days of Summer have shown, all you really need to do is watch a lot of movies, and have one mildly crappy relationship, and you’ve earned the right to make your mundane life experiences into a film, and subsequently be hailed as a genius for it.”

(500) Days of Summer (2009) (part 4 of 10)

“Not so long ago, it seemed that to make a well-regarded, critically acclaimed movie, you needed to have something remarkable to say, or at least a unique perspective on life. But as the makers of last year’s indie sensation (500) Days of Summer have shown, all you really need to do is watch a lot of movies, and have one mildly crappy relationship, and you’ve earned the right to make your mundane life experiences into a film, and subsequently be hailed as a genius for it.”

(500) Days of Summer (2009) (part 3 of 10)

“Not so long ago, it seemed that to make a well-regarded, critically acclaimed movie, you needed to have something remarkable to say, or at least a unique perspective on life. But as the makers of last year’s indie sensation (500) Days of Summer have shown, all you really need to do is watch a lot of movies, and have one mildly crappy relationship, and you’ve earned the right to make your mundane life experiences into a film, and subsequently be hailed as a genius for it.”

(500) Days of Summer (2009) (part 2 of 10)

“Not so long ago, it seemed that to make a well-regarded, critically acclaimed movie, you needed to have something remarkable to say, or at least a unique perspective on life. But as the makers of last year’s indie sensation (500) Days of Summer have shown, all you really need to do is watch a lot of movies, and have one mildly crappy relationship, and you’ve earned the right to make your mundane life experiences into a film, and subsequently be hailed as a genius for it.”

(500) Days of Summer (2009) (part 1 of 10)

“Not so long ago, it seemed that to make a well-regarded, critically acclaimed movie, you needed to have something remarkable to say, or at least a unique perspective on life. But as the makers of last year’s indie sensation (500) Days of Summer have shown, all you really need to do is watch a lot of movies, and have one mildly crappy relationship, and you’ve earned the right to make your mundane life experiences into a film, and subsequently be hailed as a genius for it.”

Action Comics #176 “Muscles for Money!” (part 2 of 2)

Action Comics #176, cover dated January 1953, features Superman being an unbelievable dick, even by Superman standards. He alienates all of his friends, completely trashes his own image, and deliberately turns public opinion against him for rather unimpressive reasons. I almost think the writer came up with this story just for a laugh, never thinking it would actually ever see the light of day.”

Action Comics #176 “Muscles for Money!” (part 1 of 2)

Action Comics #176, cover dated January 1953, features Superman being an unbelievable dick, even by Superman standards. He alienates all of his friends, completely trashes his own image, and deliberately turns public opinion against him for rather unimpressive reasons. I almost think the writer came up with this story just for a laugh, never thinking it would actually ever see the light of day.”

An Interview with Dan Woods, Degrassi's Mr. Raditch

Dan Woods played teacher (and later, principal) Dan Raditch on all five seasons of Degrassi Junior High and Degrassi High, and then returned to play Raditch again on Degrassi: The Next Generation for four more seasons. Despite being one of the ‘adults’, to me Mr. Raditch has always been a key ingredient in the Degrassi formula, and the show just hasn’t been the same without him.”

Family Ties “Help Wanted” (part 2 of 2)

“Unlike the Tom Hanks appearance, ‘Help Wanted’ cannot be classified as a ‘very special episode’ in any sense of the term, because it deals with absolutely no touchy subjects. In fact, this is one of those rare Family Ties episodes that’s genuinely funny, thanks mostly to Geena Davis’ warm and lovable screen presence.”

Family Ties “Help Wanted” (part 1 of 2)

“Unlike the Tom Hanks appearance, ‘Help Wanted’ cannot be classified as a ‘very special episode’ in any sense of the term, because it deals with absolutely no touchy subjects. In fact, this is one of those rare Family Ties episodes that’s genuinely funny, thanks mostly to Geena Davis’ warm and lovable screen presence.”