Video Show: The Graphic Novel Picture Show

VIDEO: Birds of Prey “Pilot”

In part one of a 13-part series, Sybil looks at the both the aired and unaired pilots of Birds of Prey, the WB series loosely based on the DC Comics series of the same name, featuring Batman side characters Oracle, the Huntress, and not-Black Canary fighting the evil schemes of Harley Quinn.

VIDEO: DC Comics is run by children

In this editorial, Sybil Pandemic talks about the concept of “mature entertainment” and how a certain company is doing it wrong by giving us a child’s version of maturity, undoing all their characters’ marriages and making them angsty, miserable, and hateful all the time.

VIDEO: Mystery Men (1999)

Solkir explains what he’s been up to for the past few months, and then discusses Mystery Men, based on a comic book you’ve never heard of, starring Ben Stiller, Hank Azaria, William H. Macy, and Janeane Garofalo as a team of second-rate superheroes with mostly useless powers.

VIDEO: Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (1998)

Before Samuel L. Jackson, Marvel’s Avengers, and ABC’s upcoming Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., there was an attempt to bring a live-action Nick Fury to life, starring none other than the Hoff himself. This pilot never became a series, but we did get David Hasselhoff being David Hasselhoff for 90 minutes. What more do you need?

VIDEO: Blade (1998)

Solkir reviews Wesley Snipes as the vampire hunter Blade, based on the Marvel Comics character who first appeared in the Tomb of Dracula series. So, it’s a story about killing vampires, but the slayer is a dude? Weird.

VIDEO: Steel (1997)

Solkir reviews the dumb (yet fascinating) Steel, starring Shaquille O’Neal as a weapons designer who grows a conscience and designs a powerful suit of armor so he can be a superhero. In the comics, Steel’s origin was tied up in the ’90s Death of Superman saga, but there’s no sign of Superman here. Instead, we get Judd Nelson, the Not-Oracle, and a brand new dialect created by future sex tape star Ray J.

VIDEO: Spawn (1997)

Solkir presents his own abridged version of Spawn, the movie version of the Image Comics character that personified the dark/edgy superhero aesthetic of the ’90s. A military assassin is murdered by Martin Sheen and sent to hell, but makes a deal with the devil to come back as a powerful “Hellspawn”. But no hell could possibly be worse than this movie’s piss-poor CGI.