Video Show: The DVD Shelf

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Life is short, so skip the bad movies and let your host David Rose reveal, review, and recommend the ones you should have on your own DVD shelf. The DVD Shelf is a film-lover’s safe haven to bask in the warm glow of cult favorites, over-looked cinematic gems, rediscovered classics, and downright fun flicks on both DVD and Blu-ray.

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VIDEO: Good Morning, Vietnam (1987)

In tribute to the late, great Robin Williams, the DVD Shelf reviews the 1987 comedic war drama Good Morning, Vietnam, which loosely tells the story of Airman Adrian Cronauer, who spent some time as a morning radio DJ over in Vietnam during the mid ’60s and took it upon himself to bring a taste of home to the American soldiers stationed in the country by providing them with lively broadcasts and playing the day’s most popular music.

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VIDEO: Bad Santa (2003)

In this special holiday episode, we sit on the lap of the 2003 dark comedy Bad Santa, which stars Billy Bob Thornton as an embittered veteran con artist who spends his Christmases burglarize shopping malls with his short-of-stature business partner, played by Tony Cox, while in the guise of a department store Santa Claus and his helper elf.

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VIDEO: The Green Hornet (2011)

The ongoing trend of big budget comic book movies has had its ups and downs, and one major down for many fans has been the 2011 reboot of the ’30s-era pulp crimefighter the Green Hornet, starring comedic actor Seth Rogen as a much goofier Green Hornet than we’ve ever seen before.

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VIDEO: The DVD Shelf goes Hawaiian

Bursting at the seams with colorful footage filmed on-location in Hawaii, this virtual vacation will jet you off to the beautiful island of Oahu, where you’ll learn all about Hawaiian history and culture while discovering numerous filming locations seen in a handful of great movies that filmed in the islands, including The Descendants, 50 First Dates, From Here to Eternity, Elvis Presley’s Hawaii Trilogy, and even the mega-blockbuster Jurassic Park

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VIDEO: Falling Down (1993)

Michael Douglas is a gun-toting anti-hero who navigates the gritty Los Angeles landscape in Joel Schumacher’s 1993 psychological thriller Falling Down. Along with a review of the film and its Blu-ray, this video also contains brief reviews of six other movies that share similar themes, including Taxi Driver and Hobo with a Shotgun!

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VIDEO: Twilight Zone: The Movie (1983)

David enters another dimension, not only of sight and sound but of mind, to review the 1983 anthology film Twilight Zone: The Movie, featuring four separate stories brought to life by four of the era’s most sought-after filmmakers, including Steven Spielberg and John Landis. He also briefly touches on the history of the classic TV series and its legendary creator, Rod Serling.

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VIDEO: Total Recall (1990)

Recently, Hollywood made an attempt to wipe the original Total Recall from your memory, but The DVD Shelf is here to remember it for you—wholesale! We’ll delve into the Schwarzenegger classic, beginning with the original Philip K. Dick short story that inspired it, the film’s lengthy development, and how they pulled it all together. And, yes, we’ll even look at that remake.

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VIDEO: Lars and the Real Girl (2007)

The DVD Shelf takes a look at Lars and the Real Girl, a charming story about a boy and his doll. Ryan Gosling plays Lars, a delusional man who orders a love doll off the internet and develops a romantic relationship with her, much to the chagrin of his family and acquaintances. David takes a look at the DVD and its special features, and all the while, he surfs the web to find out how to order a Real Doll of his own.

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VIDEO: Batman: The Movie (1966)

In this monumental episode, the DVD Shelf celebrates the lighter side of the Dark Knight by delving deep into the 1966 Batman movie starring Adam West and Burt Ward, including lots of insight into the classic TV series and the dire state of comic books at the time. Also, David reveals additional DVD titles that no ’60s Bat-fan should be without!

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VIDEO: Godzilla (1954)

In this kaiju-sized episode of the DVD Shelf Movie Reviews, we delve deep into the creation of one of the most famous giant monsters in movie history, Godzilla! Born out of World War II’s impact on Japan, Godzilla has gone on to star in nearly thirty movies over the years, but none are as dark, ominous, and captivating as the original 1954 black-and-white film that started it all.

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VIDEO: An American Werewolf in London (1981)

In this episode, we take a look at the classic ’80s horror/comedy An American Werewolf in London, directed by John Landis. We’ll look at the Landis’s inspirations and what effect the film had on his future directing career, including Michael Jackson’s “Thriller”. We’ll also look at the Oscar-winning makeup effects by Rick Baker, and why they make the film so unforgettable.

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VIDEO: Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)

In this episode, we take nearly one hour to look at the beloved live-action/animation hybrid Who Framed Roger Rabbit! We’ll cover everything from the inception of the original novel, to the years it took to get to the big screen, the century-old techniques used to bring the story to life, and the film’s expansive 2-disc DVD set.

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VIDEO: The Great Outdoors (1988)

In this episode, David tries to shake off the cold weather (and a head cold) by looking at the classic summer vacation comedy The Great Outdoors starring Dan Aykroyd and John Candy. This episode includes a brief look at the careers of Aykroyd and Candy, along with legendary writer-producer-director John Hughes, who wrote the screenplay.

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VIDEO: Ed Wood (1994)

It’s the debut episode of The DVD Shelf, where your host David Rose reveals, reviews, and recommends the movies you should have on your own DVD shelf! He takes a look at the Tim Burton film Ed Wood, starring Johnny Depp as one of the worst directors in history, and delves into Wood’s real life to see how it compares to Burton’s hilarious vision of the man.