VIDEO: Texas Chainsaw 3D (2013)

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Cecil takes a look at the history of the Texas Chainsaw Massacre franchise, and what led up to the 2013 sequel, Texas Chainsaw 3D.

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  • Perfect replication of a classic movie set/location? Somebody should tell these guys about Minecraft.

    • Cecil_Trachenburg

      Eventually they will do an entire movie/game/tv show within Minecraft.

  • Muthsarah

    You actually saw “Failure to Launch”? I repeat: You actually SAW “Failure to Launch”? YOU actually saw “Failure to Launch”?

    Seriously, would the knowledge that a newly-popular actor had ever appeared in something cheap and bad and oh-so-shelved actually hurt their cache with audiences? Don’t we all know how many actors had to rise up through the muck (well, most of them)? Are fickle, shallow, judgmental mass audiences really that dumb? And should such idiocy be honored, or else dismissed as the random, impulsive synaptic-murmurings of a fruit fly?

    OK,technical question time: You say that you feel the direction of the 2003 film is “garbage”. K. I’ve gotten to the level in film-watchery where I can tell good editing from bad editing. But not good directing from bad directing. Bearing in mind that I haven’t seen this film, what makes it badly-directed? And what, similarly, makes anything otherwise-well-written and well-acted into something poorly-directed?

    I suppose I should see the 1974 film ASAP, right? Seen Halloween, Friday, Nightmare, Alien (it’s a horror film!), and even Life Force, which was apparently debatably-Hooper, given…cocaine or somethng. They’re all fun. Think there’s still any scares left in it after all the “homages” and such?

    • Cecil_Trachenburg

      Yeah, we were stuck in a hotel room and it was the only thing on. I kept it on mostly for Zooey Deschanel and I laughed at how they still were trying to pass Parker off as attractive. I’ve seen a bunch of McConaughey’s romantic comedies and this was one of his worst.

      There is always this idea that if there is an old movie that surfaces and it has an actor/actress at the beginning of their career that it would somehow tarnish their image. Like how Christian Slater would deny he starred in Twisted where he played a drooling psychopath. (which resurfaced around the time his career was blowing up with Robin Hood) I think in general publicists of the stars panic too much about things like this.

      As far as directing…yesh. I may have to do a video on the subject I don’t have nearly enough time to talk about it fully.

      It depends. The 74 film is a classic and it deserves to be. However, so much has been copied from it over the past years that it may not be as effective for you now. It’s light on story but heavy on atmosphere, which does help it to stand the test of time. Also, it is just plain creepy.

      • Muthsarah

        “Yeah, we were stuck in a hotel room and it was the only thing on. I kept it on mostly for Zooey Deschanel and”

        Hush. You need say no more.

        “There is always this idea that if there is an old movie that surfaces
        and it has an actor/actress at the beginning of their career that it
        would somehow tarnish their image.”

        I wish I could recall specific memories of this kinda stuff (prolly best I can’t), but I actually do recall, from my movie theatre days, patrons emerging from the dark, complaining such like “Why did [this person] make this movie. I just saw them in [some movie] earlier this year, and it was so good. Why follow that with this one?”, as if movies can be banged out in a month, and a new star of an April film hadn’t already signed on (if not already completely their shooting) of a film to be released in October. Maybe publicists understand the idiocy of the general moviegoer better than either of us realize?

        “As far as directing…yesh. I may have to do a video on the subject I don’t have nearly enough time to talk about it fully.”

        Oh, please do. Teach us. All I know of editing is what I’ve learned from Thelma Schoonmaker (I actually met her in person a coupla months ago, she came to my local video store!), I haven’t yet had even a introductory course in direction.

        “It depends. The 74 film is a classic and it deserves to be. However, so
        much has been copied from it over the past years that it may not be as
        effective for you now. It’s light on story but heavy on atmosphere,
        which does help it to stand the test of time. Also, it is just plain
        creepy.”

        K then. Warning taken. Assume I haven’t seen any classic horror film (other than Friday, Nightmare, Halloween and….nothing else): Which of the eldritch features would be the most-likely-rewarding? Basically, recommend anything 1970s horror that isn’t Halloween, and I will see it. Local video store permitting.

        • Cecil_Trachenburg

          Unfortunately, the general movie going public are many of the same people who keep shows like Honey Boo Boo on the air, so that makes sense. It reminds me of when I was on the set of the Avengers. There were people in the crowd that were complaining that the movie was going to be dull because there was so much time (between shots!) where everyone was just standing around. They also didn’t understand things like guys in mocap suits and the fact that it takes a long time to set up for a scene that maybe take 10 seconds of film.

          I’d love to do a video on directing, I just don’t know when I would be able to. (considering it took me 3 months to do the trailers one, yesh, the directing one would be a while) I’ve directed a few things myself (just shorts and stuff were I work) and been on plenty of sets both big budget and super low so I like to think I have a pretty decent grasp on the whole thing. Not being snobby, I just think that directing these days is become a lost art. Not everyone knows how to do it well.

          As far as 70s must see horror (aside from the original TCM), I would say stuff like Suspiria, The Wicker Man, Torso, Black Christmas, Hausu, and Zombie.

      • $36060516

        I haven’t seen the movie, but just watched the trailer and found it hard to see why Parker being attractive is so impossible to believe that it was laughable.

        • Cecil_Trachenburg

          Because I don’t find her even the smallest bit attractive. Meanwhile, they try to make Deschanel out as the “weird frumpy” girl in the movie.

  • This is the only Texas Chainsaw Massacre film I’ve ever seen and I’ll second that it was entertaining, but that’s because I was laughing the whole time. It reached its nadir when the climax tried to have me rooting for Leatherface of all people and especially when the sheriff tells her ‘okay, just take your murderous flesh-eating cousin home and keep an eye on him’. All in all it’s like if an absolute idiot tried to remake Stoker.

    • Cecil_Trachenburg

      The Sheriff had watched a major crime go down in front of him and had been unable to stop it. (yes, the family was guilty but so was the lynch mob) As such, he had been under the thumb of Burt for the past few decades. When it came time for Leatherface to kill him, he was seeing it as a way to finally get his life back.

      Also, its a movie.

      • I know it’s a movie, that’s why I had so much fun watching it. I still don’t see how allowing Leatherface to continue murdering people instead of just having him arrested and committed to a mental hospital is heroic in any way though, and as much as I oppose vigilantism I can’t find myself considering the lynch mob to be anywhere near as bad as Leatherface and family.

        • Cecil_Trachenburg

          A bit more snark than was intended. I hadn’t had my coffee yet.

          Anyway, no what the lynch mob did wasn’t worse than what the Sawyer family had been doing for who knows how long. However, what the locals did was still illegal.

          In the end I think it was more about the Sheriff seeing how out of hand the townies had become. Here was a girl who had nothing to do with the preceeding events that they were all set to murder simply because she was a relative. He didn’t have the fortitude to stand up to them but saw an out by just letting them go. (goddamn it, now I have that song in my head)

  • fearfanforever

    As much fun as I had watching this, and as much as I appreciate the attention to detail…
    Just couldn’t get into this one. Mostly, the time frame thing, and it felt WAY too glossy. Sorry. When I get around to this series, I may have to alter my opinion after a second viewing, but for now, I’m not too eager to see another sequel.

    • Cecil_Trachenburg

      I liked that they set up a few things with this. I enjoyed that while it did have some comedic elements, it was a tad more serious than the previous (non-Bay) sequels were. For me, it just felt right. I know that coming roughly 40 years after the original that they will never exactly capture the elements of the first but overall, I thought it worked.

  • CAFR

    This might be the worst thing to ever have the words “Texas Chainsaw” attached to it. And considering some of the guff that’s come out with them, that’s saying something.

    • Cecil_Trachenburg

      Oh pish posh. The 2003 remake was far worse and not just because it was produced by Bay.

      • CAFR

        I actually have a soft spot for 2003. It might be the the third best thing to ever bare those words, in my opinion.

  • $36060516

    Wow, another impressive (and funny) intro to the show!

    I will make an extremely petty nitpick and say that I doubt they invited Tobe Hooper to watch the last film described out of the goodness of their hearts. The obvious goal of the film was to attract genre enthusiasts who value faithfulness to the classics (given the pains they took that you described), and so it was a necessary marketing coup for them to court Hooper’s blessing. If he didn’t like it they simply wouldn’t mention that they screened it for him and he probably wouldn’t have criticized it himself in the press while it was in theaters, given that it’s seen as unprofessional in the industry to sabotage ticket sales and he’d like to keep getting work in the future (possibly even with the company releasing the remake).

    • Cecil_Trachenburg

      Thanks!

      The thing was, when they were doing the marketing for the picture, they didn’t plaster Tobe Hooper’s name all over it like they would say, a Tim Burton production. (like how they fooled people into thinking Burton directed A Nightmare Before Christmas) They wanted to show the creator because they were proud of the continuation of his work. Yes, they also wanted his blessing because it would look better but they never publicized it. (I didn’t know anything about it until I bought the bluray and saw that they did this)

  • John Wilson

    I loved the fourth film. Its just so goofy its amazing. I never really liked “Texas chainsaw 73”. I don’t know why, same with the original “Halloween”. Maybe its been redone so many times with other movies that it loses something. While the goofy ones are one of a kind.

    • Cecil_Trachenburg

      I like TCM The Next Generation for being so damn silly. It’s by no means a “good” movie but it is entertaining.