Category: Book Review

Armada (2015)

“Zack comes off as a nerd who won’t shut up for five minutes so the plot can progress. Mind you, this didn’t stop me from liking the book, but then again, I know I would do the exact same thing.”

Ready Player One (2011)

“Set in the not-so-distant future of 2044, the plot follows 18-year-old Wade Watts AKA Parzival, as he spends his days hunting for an Easter egg in his favorite video game. Sounds kind of uneventful, doesn’t it? Or at least, it sounds like my Saturday afternoons, and therefore not exactly novel-worthy material, but the book is surprisingly awesome and realistic.”

VIDEO: The Honor Harrington Series

It’s Ursa’s birthday, so she’s celebrating with a woman who kicks butt and takes names… in spaaaaaaace! It’s the Honorverse series of books that transplants the adventures of Horatio Hornblower into the 41st century (and into a female protagonist). Also featuring Prince Zuko, the suspiciously familiar Ode to Exposition, and a special appearance by our own Porn Critic!

VIDEO: The October Daye Series

For Ursa’s second anniversary, she does a spoiler-free review of Seanan McGuire’s October Daye fantasy novel series, about a private investigator named October “Toby” Daye who happens to be a changeling, i.e., half human and half faerie.

VIDEO: Puppets by Daniel Hecht

Yulia showcases her favorite mystery novel of all time: Daniel Hecht’s Puppets, the prequel to Skull Session, and a grossly underrated tale about a serial killer who hangs his victims like marionettes on the wall… and it has some stuff about illegal government experiments, too.

VIDEO: This Book is Full of Spiders

It’s the first episode of Fright Bites, a new weekly series from the Fear Fan where he provides brief horror reviews. Here, he looks at the horror novel This Book Is Full of Spiders: Seriously, Dude, Don’t Touch It by David Wong, author of John Dies at the End, soon to be a major motion picture starring Paul Giamatti. 

Fear by L. Ron Hubbard

“You see it time and again in every internet bio of L. Ron Hubbard that he was just some “obscure science-fiction author” who just happened to stumble onto the biggest money making concern since sliced bread. Putting everything else aside, that’s simply not true. Not only was he one of the founding fathers of modern sci-fi, but that wasn’t even what he was famous for.”